Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Dating Wade Marks Keys to Dating Wade pottery and identifying Wade Marks Wade is historically famous for the introduction of the very collectible Wade Whimsies and the, almost as well known but not as popular today, Wade Gurgle Jugs and Decanters. His father was a potters thrower and later became a manager. The original Wade company manufactured ceramic products for the cotton industry as well as porcelain figures and groups. In George Wade purchased the ceramics business of Henry Hallen of Wellington Street, Burslem and combined both businesses to form a new ceramics manufactory he called the Manchester Pottery. Young George was only 2 years old when his older sister Daisy, died in leaving George an only child. In , George Albert Wade left school and joined the Wade family business just as his father acquired the Hallen business and the Manchester Pottery began operations. Over the years the Wade pottery companies and Wade Marks included: Flaxman can be missing. Ulster Pottery, Portadown, Co. Can be impressed or printed.

Collecting Guide: 10 things you need to know about Chinese ceramics

Japanese Imari Porcelain Known for its colorful, intricate style, Korean-inspired Japanese imari porcelain often features white and blue backgrounds accented with vibrant orange-red and brilliant gold. Imari is in direct contrast to the monochromatic, blue and white, Chinese-inspired Arita-style porcelain also popular in Japan.

Imari porcelain was first created in the 17th century in the town of Arita.

Dated porcelain comes more often than not in the form of a dedication or verse on the outer circumference or on the lid of a porcelain vessel. The date is usually in the form of a cyclic calendar year, often accompanied with the season or moon (lunar month).

Sign in or sign up and post using a HubPages Network account. Comments are not for promoting your articles or other sites. I’m not sure what is giving people the impression someone will be appraising their jewelry, or even answering their questions, as nowhere is it even suggested – much less stated – that these services will be provided. The reason you are not getting responses is because you are posting them in a “comments” forum.

The author is asking for your comments on her article: What would you have liked to learn about? Thanks Nick CalvinsStar 3 weeks ago Very helpful information! But, I’m confused about something that is probably under my nose, so to speak. I see all these posts for help, but I don’t see any responses. The Clasp diagram is great! Is there a way to know how long each style was used? Only the ‘s indicates it’s still used. Does anyone have information on the designer or mark “Vero.

Chinese Snuff Bottles

You’ll also be signed up to receive e-newsletters from Antique Trader and partners. Anne Gilbert May 22, Colorful Chinese porcelains have been popular with collectors for decades, and continue to bring good prices at auction. Then there are pieces labeled famille noir, famille verte and famille juaune.

Reign marks should be studied together with the many different variations of hallmarks, auspicious marks, potters’ marks and symbols that you find on the bases of Chinese porcelain throughout the ages.

The way a base of a vessel is cut, finished and glazed changes throughout the dynasties, so looking at bases can help enormously with dating and authentication. Potters who are trying to fake ceramics often may not have an original example to look at, relying instead on photographs in auction catalogues or books that do not feature the bases. A ding white-glazed melon-shaped ewer, Five Dynasties-Northern Song dynasty This inadvertently gave texture, energy and shading to the design and was highly admired in the 18th century.

A fine blue and white double-gourd flask, Qianlong six-character seal mark in underglaze blue and of the period The blue varied throughout the dynasties. For example, during the Wanli period — blue and white wares often have a greyish-blue tone; in the Jiajing period — blue and white wares tend to have an almost purplish blue.

For example, Song dynasty ceramics often drew on nature for their inspiration and have foliate forms. Chinese ceramics also have beautiful proportions.

CHINESE REPUBLIC (1912-1949) and other MARKS OVERVIEW

We look at the design of various types of furniture and furnishings, the interior architecture , as well as materials and techniques, plus some of the main designers. Menuiserie or Ebenisterie During the 16th century furniture was the province of the menuisier who worked in solid wood. The nearest English equivalent to the term is ‘carpenter and joiner’, but this is not entirely satisfactory. At this time the technique of inlaying, extremely fashionable in Italy, was in France the province of the menuisier, but when it was replaced by more sophisticated techniques such as veneering and marquetry in the early years of the 17th century, the most skilled menuisiers became known as ebenistes, a term often translated as ‘cabinet-maker’ which again is not strictly accurate.

The menuisier proper continued to be responsible for seat-furniture, table-supports, such furniture as buffets a kind of cupboard and armoires wardrobes of solid wood, the decorative carved panelling for walls boiseries , door-cases and overdoor mouldings, and window-cases and shutters.

Find great deals on eBay for china antique porcelain. Shop with confidence.

Whether you collect antique Chinese pottery vases, eighteenth century British sterling silver or any type of antique at all, you know the understanding of antique identification marks is invaluable. Thousands of Antique Identification Marks When thinking of all antiques in existence there are tens of thousands, if not more, of different identification marks. For instance one website, Antique-Marks, has more than 10, images of maker’s marks and trademarks found on antique pottery and porcelain.

Every collector, whether a novice or seasoned, needs accurate resources that help to identify and value pieces of interest. The same is true for antique dealers, auctioneers and pickers. With the vast number of identification marks, it is virtually impossible to recognize all of the different manufacturers of one specific category, such as English porcelain.

Antique Chinese Porcelain

The Zentner Collection offers the largest collection of Japanese Tansu in the World, outside of Japan, as well as one of the largest fine Asian art collection in the country. Store Hours Wednesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm Tuesday: By Appointment 11am – 5pm Phone: All pieces are either directly imported from the country of origin, purchased from estates, or consigned from select collections. Japanese antique include tansu, Imari, netsuke, ikebana baskets, mingei items, Japanese scrolls, screens, prints and framed art.

The bumpy feel on the base of this porcelain vase is called “orange peel” and is indicative of late 18th-century Chinese export porcelain. The blue on this glaze indicates it was made in Japan.

Welcome to the Gotheborg. The field of Asian Ceramics collecting is a challenging one. Not the least due to the large number of terms of various origins, problem compounded by a variety of spellings and transcriptions. Many terms in particular regarding porcelain exported to the west are made up by collectors and dealers over the last century, and are not recognized or even understood in China.

When possible I have tried to address this by cross referencing both terms and explain where the understanding differ. Names, meanings and categories also change depending on new discoveries, which might not be as helpful as it might seem. Too myopic classifications might just complicate matters. Here I try to go back to the roots and explain why an older but somewhat incorrect name might still be more helpful than a modern but archaeologically correct name.

Many names and terms that are Chinese in origin have been transcribed in western characters. In old books this was often done by a system called Wade-Giles Peking, Ching-te-chen, Chien-lung , while all modern books today use a system called Pinjin Beijing, Jingdezhen, Qianlong.

£53m Chinese vase was kept on wobbly bookcase and insured for just £800

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Staffordshire Porcelain Get to know your antique porcelain collectibles by learning to recognise Staffordshire porcelain. Most people have probably heard of Staffordshire Porcelain, and most vintage and antique porcelain collectors are probably familiar with the name. Is it a company name?

Is it a style, or type of porcelain? Is it just a region that porcelain comes from?

The only rule that is really certain when it comes to Chinese porcelain marks, is that most of them are NOT from the period they say. Still the marks are something of a fingerprint of the potter and its time, and from a careful study they offer a great help in identifying the date and maker of most Chinese porcelain.

All new marks are in the proper alphabetical order but the text will be red and in italics for a short time so as to highlight the newly added marks. There are about new marks. Since then I have acquired many more different marks, as well as more examples of known marks. Some are different combinations of reign marks but there are still over marks to cover the marks of all the Chinese Dynasties from the Shang BCE to the Guangxu reign ending in A relatively small but important number of Republic marks are also included.

Some marks were used to commemorate a very special event, and some were simply date marks. However, the relative proportions of these categories of marks changed during the Republic with reign marks nearly all, if not all, apocryphal — there is still some dispute over whether the Hongxian or Jurentang marks can be labelled as reign marks still making up the bulk of marks, but with private kiln or company marks making up the large majority of the rest.

Hallmarks and commendations were still reasonably common, but the commendations moved location from the base of the porcelains to the written inscriptions on the sides of the porcelains in the Late Qing and Republic eras. So these Late Qing and Republic aged porcelains have another very important attribute. Many of the non-imperial derived patterns have inscriptions, usually in black enamel and which include some or all of the following elements: This gives us an enormous amount of information not accessible from the porcelains of earlier eras.

Chinese ceramics

Some historians believe that ceramics production may have started there in the Han dynasty BC. Pine wood was found in abundance around the town. The Chang River provided transport for raw material to the kilns as well as for later shipping of the finished products. In summary, the ample clay resources, fuel supply, convenient transportation and eventual imperial favors provided the necessary catalyst for potters from other places in China to join in the commercial pottery production in the town.

Other texts say that pottery was being made at Jingdezhen by A.

Six character iron red stamped mark on the base, Jiangxi Yu Yuan Chang Zuo where Jiangxi is the province where most of the Chinese porcelain industry is located, Yu is a name meaning ‘gold’, Yuan is a name, meaning ‘first’ or ‘primary’, Chang, is a name, meaning ‘prosperous’ and zuo meaning ‘workshop’.

D Medium teapot of reasonable good quality. The overall appearance and color is nice. There is a little side clearance in the lid and a short, now mended, hairline near the handle. The tip of the spout is restored. An unusual potters mark in the bottom is deep and clear. The teapot will be delivered with a Certificate of Authenticity Size: Most of this work is concentrated to the South China Sea, a virtual highway for ancient shipping linking China to India, the Middle East and Southeast Asia in an extensive maritime trade system.

This ancient trade started sometime around the 4th century and lasted well into the 19th century. Following a successful shipwreck discovery, the company obtain a government permit to excavate the wreckage, and then carry out detailed marine archaeological procedures in recovering the artifacts, mapping the ship’s remains and securing other data for future research. After each concluded project and following conservation of recovered artifacts, we search for and pinpoint ruined kiln sites and compare its wasters with the recovered ceramics until we are satisfied we located the place in which the shipwreck pottery was made centuries earlier.

As such we have precisely located a kiln sites in Sisatchanalai, northern Thailand in which our Royal Nanhai and the Nanyang shipwreck celadon ware was made around AD.

Identify Antique China Patterns

The city of Longquan in the coastal Chinese province of Zhejian is known for its celadon pottery and the traditional firing technology that imparts its distinctive glaze. Compounded from violet-golden clay and a mixture of burnt feldspar, limestone, quartz and plant ash, the glaze is prepared from recipes that have often been handed down for generations by teachers or within families. The glaze is applied to a fired stoneware vessel, which is then fired again in a repeated cycle of six stages of heating and cooling where precise temperatures matter a great deal: The final product may take either of two styles:

The strength of the designs and drawing at this time were never reproduced later on. Kangxi and Qianlong period copies of the early Ming pieces are generally over-crowded, with less substantial brush finished foot rims, which were not under-cut like their early Ming counterparts. Many of the later pieces had a different construction: On early wares footrims tended to be relatively large in proportion to the piece and more often than not finished with a knife.

The other high point for blue and white porcelain was the Chenghua period and it is worth noting that the best Kangxi copies of this period are often difficult to distinguish from the original. In the near future I will be able to offer some boxes and teabowls and saucers from the Ca Ma wreck the history of which I have listed below; The prices of the boxes range from 50 UK pounds upwards. These Chinese porcelain boxes 10 cm. It is believed that this boat sink as a result of an intense fire probably from the galley.

The wreck was about 35 metres long and thirty six metres deep, the contents of the wreck were spread out over an area of approximately square miles, much of the porcelain was protected by a layer of silt, but fishermen’s nets had damaged large quantities of the porcelain. The porcelain had been packed into wooden barrels. The dating of the wreck was arrived at by some wine cups with the Yongzheng mark, some bronze coins from the Kangxi period and also some wine cups with the mark ‘Ruo shen zhen cang’, which translates to ‘In the collection of Ruoshen’ a mark associated with the Kangxi period.

All this strongly indicates that the porcelain is early Yongzheng We recommend the following books:

Chinese Dragon Vases

Hidden within the kanji — the characters — on the bottom of the piece you will typically find the production region, a specific kiln location, a potter’s name, and sometimes a separate decorator’s identity. But, at times only generic terms were recorded, and tracking down more information requires expert advice. Consulting a china expert, a certified appraiser, or an antiques and collectible dealer in person may be your style, but you can also utilize the many available online resources, most of which have helpful photographs.

Consulting a Professional Contacting a china or antiques dealer can be the quickest way to identify your porcelain marks.

However, most antique figurines date from the Edo and Meiji periods, and are made of wood, ivory, bronze or porcelain. Netsuke were small wood or ivory figurines, worn on cords from a person’s obi sash. Okimono figurines, made of wood, ivory or bronze, were displayed in an alcove tokonoma in the family house; they were produced mainly during the 19th century. Porcelain figurines have been made since the 17th century, and often depict geisha, or gods and goddesses. Examine the figurine to see what it represents: Note the material that it is made of.

Measure the height of the piece.

Chat on Reference Books / Marks Identification Dating Pottery & Porcelain